Thursday, December 14, 2017

In honor of Hanukkah, we are highlighting the original location of the SECOND AVE DELI in the East Village

This Jewish Delicatessen/Restaurant was opened in 1954 by Abe Lebewohl, a Jewish immigrant from Russia. It specialized in Matzo Ball soup, aka Jewish penicillin and corned beef and pastrami sandwiches. Sadly, Abe Lebewohl was killed in 1996 during a robbery after the restaurant had closed for the night. Jack Lebewohl, Abe’s brother took over the delicatessen but was forced to close in January 2006 because the rent on the 2,800 square foot space was raised from $24,000 a month to $33,000 a month. @2ndavedeli later reopened in Midtown with a similar menu and has since opened another location on the Upper East Side. Photo from 2003 appears in our book "Store Front:The Disappearing Face of New York". #storefront  #disappearingfaceofnewyork


From our post 30 Years of Photo Favorites explained

https://jamesandkarlamurray.blogspot.com/2017/12/30-years-of-some-of-our-favorite-photos.html

"We love photographing "dead buildings. We named our first NYC graffiti book "Broken Windows" as a play on Mayor Guiliani's "broken window" policing strategy at that time to combat graffiti and petty crimes as well as the actual broken windows we encountered while photographing murals painted by graffiti artists in abandoned buildings in the Bronx, Brooklyn, Harlem and Queens."


Wednesday, December 13, 2017

Photos from our Christmas time visit to Glaser's Bake Shop for 6sqft:

LINK: https://www.6sqft.com/where-i-work-glasers-german-bakery-has-been-satisfying-yorkvilles-sweet-tooth-for-115-years/ 

Glaser's Bake Shop @glasersbakeshop in Yorkville, Manhattan has been in business since 1902. It was founded by John Glaser, a German immigrant, who originally specialized in baking breads but later on added cookies, cakes, pies and other sweets. They are known for their delicious black-and-white cookies and their Bavarian pastries and brownies. 


Tuesday, December 12, 2017

30 years of favorites highlight: D'Auria & Sons Pork Store in the Little Italy of the #Bronx

Full post: https://jamesandkarlamurray.blogspot.com/2017/12/30-years-of-some-of-our-favorite-photos.html 

D'Auria & Sons Pork Store in the Little Italy of the #Bronx, which was in business from 1938-2006. Photo taken using 35mm film in 2004 and pictured in the photo is the 2nd generation owner Mike D'Auria who told us that what makes his sausages special are the TLC (tender loving care). Mike also told us that he was not the "marrying kind" and had no children of his own to take over the family business when he retired, which tempted us to learn the trade from him so that we could keep the business alive. Photo and full interview with Mike appears in our book "Store Front:The Disappearing Face of New York".


Monday, December 11, 2017

Photos from our visit to Sims Municipal Recycling Facility for 6sqft...

LINK: https://www.6sqft.com/the-urban-lens-the-surprising-beauty-of-sunset-parks-sims-municipal-recycling-facility/

"The beauty of trash is not often lauded, but out on the Brooklyn waterfront, at Sunset Park’sSims Municipal Recycling Facility, the process is oddly mesmerizing. En masse, the glass and plastic shards processed in the building’s bowels become a disposable rainbow, the sharp shapes of residential recyclables a testament to the mesmerizing aesthetic of large-scale sustainability."


Jingle Hell's, Lower East Side, NYC

This bar has a very anti-Christmas name but actually is full of lots of holiday decorations 🎅 🎄 lights ✨✨ and garlands. A closer look however 👀 reveals an "unexpected twist". #storefront


Sunday, December 10, 2017

Signed copies of our books "Store Front" (Mini edition) and "Store Front II" (Mini edition) now available at The Tenement Museum Shop.

All proceeds from the sales of the books help support this Lower East Side treasure.

James and Karla Murray’s classic tome from their ongoing Store Front series is now available for the first time in its covetable “mini” format. The Murrays have been capturing impeccable photographs from the streets of New York City since the 1990s. With Store Front II they’ve continued their documentation of an important cross-section of New York’s “Mom and Pop” economy. The Murray’s penetrating photographs are only half the story though. Their copious background texts, gleaned largely from interviews with the stores’ owners and employees, bring wonderful color and nuance to the importance of these unique one-off establishments.